Born in wartime Liverpool, Frederick Fowell has a strict but fair upbringing. Even though at six, a psychosomatic illness robbed the young Freddie of the power of speech, and he spent two years away from his family recovering, nothing could keep this irrepressible lad down for long. The shape of things to come was evident even then: Freddie had a five mile walk to school everyday with his mates and one day he just couldn't resist picking up a fresh cowpat in one of the fields en route and aiming it at the head of one of his pals....a free for all followed which resulted in five boys turning up at school plastered in not very pleasant smelling brown stuff - of course, when they ended up in the headmaster's office, it was Freddie who talked them out of a tight spot!

Freddie always had a gut feeling that he wasn't going to end up on a building site or working on the docks and, although he did have a day job, especially after he married at seventeen, he also had a singing career to nurture. Everybody has some idea of the music scene in Liverpool in the 1960s and Freddie was very involved, including stints in Hamburg like many of the famous groups including The Beatles. After a while Freddie decided it was time to try out some of his other talents, and began to introduce a few gags and some impressions into the group's act - the audiences loved it! and pretty soon he began to steal every show. So it wasn't long before Freddie Starr went solo.

In 1970 came a big break - Freddie was invited to appear on the highly prestigious Royal Variety Performance. Although his carefully worked out act was cut to a mere three minutes, such was the audience response that he became the first performer in forty-seven years to be allowed an encore!

After the Royal Variety Performance, Freddie's career really took off and he has delighted millions of people over the past thirty years; in summer seasons, in clubs and cabaret and on many television shows, his own and other people's. A friend of many of the big showbusiness names, his brilliant impressions of many of them usually reduced both their subject and the rest of us to helpless laughter. And he somehow manages to stay friends with them even after perpetrating his trademark practical jokes. Take Des O' Connor for instance. Appearing on Des's show (not for the first time), Freddie decided to change the mood of Des's sentimental closing song which had been created partly by the tinkling of a fountain in the background. Freddie arranged for the fountain to emit noises rather more gurgling and worse as Des launched into his song and, when Freddie came on set dressed as a plumber and proceeded to try to fix the fountain, the audience were helpless. The game was up of course when Des, not known for his ability to keep a straight face under any circumstances, finally spotted Freddie behind him!

Freddie always enjoyed his singing and his first album, After the laughter, was a top ten hit and subsequent albums have always met with great public and critical acclaim. Freddie's other great passion, apart from his work, is owning and breeding thoroughbred racehorses, and it was one of the happiest and most rewarding moments of his life when Richard Dunwoody rode his horse Minnehoma to victory in the Grand National in 1994.

With a well-deserved and established place in the pantheon of great performers, Freddie could now enjoy life at a slightly more leisurely pace with his third wife Donna. He spends a lot of time at their home in Spain, but is still bursting with ideas for new shows and is ready at the drop of a hat to make the two hour journey home. There's plenty of life and energy still waiting to explode - often described as outrageous, madcap, crazy, Freddie Starr is all these things, but he's also a great ballad singer, a brilliant impressionist and an accomplished actor - look out for the next explosion!

Return Home